There are over 250 parishes in the county, here they have been divided into five groups based on modern boundaries. Before 1974 all records are defined by the historic county boundaries which included the town of Milton Keynes and followed the Thames in the south of the county.

Material is being transferred into this section and the old format retired.

Drayton Beauchamp

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 1888

Easting & Northing: 490212

Grid Ref SP900120 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Drayton Beauchamp PARISH St Mary
Daraintone NAMES name for Drayton in Domesday Book in 1086
Draitone NAMES name for Drayton Beauchamp in Domesday Book in 1086
Draitone NAMES name for Drayton in Domesday Book in 1086
Drayton Becham NAMES name for Drayton Beauchamp in 1526
Drayton Pasloo NAMES name for Drayton Parslow in 1535
Drayton Paslow NAMES name for Drayton Parslow in 1526
Drayton Passelowe NAMES name for Drayton Parslow in 1501
Helstrope PLACE within the parish
Painsend PLACE within the parish
Shire Lane PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 191
1811 224
1821 272
1831 275
1841 231
1851 261
1861 268
1871 227
1881 194
1891 177
1901 149
1911 147
1921 146
1931 153
1941 N/A
1951 156
1961 141
1971 137
1981 167
1991 161

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Drayton Beauchamp   St Mary   Baptisms   1538   1820   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Drayton Beauchamp   St Mary   Marriages   1541   1837   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Drayton Beauchamp   St Mary   Burials   1653   1830   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 BATE BROWN SMITH SMITH
2 NORWOOD SMITH STRATFORD BROWN
3 PAYNE MORTIMER GRIFFIN BATE
4 MARTIN PUTTENHAM HORWOOD GRIFFIN
5 MALLARD GREEN STEVENS NORWOOD
6 BAATE COVENTRY CHAPPIN MARTIN
7 DURRENT BATES RODWELL PAYNE
8 PUTNAM WATERS PARADINE STRATFORD
9 STONHILL GRIFFIN CHAPMAN PUTTENHAM
10 HAILE PIDDINGTON HORN MORTIMER

Description

Description of Drayton Beauchamp from Sheahan, 1861.

This parish lies on the eastern verge of the county, occupying a narrow tract of land above seven miles in length, by half a mile in width. It includes a portion of the Chiltern range of hills, and is bounded on the east by Hertfordshire. The area is 1,874 acres, and the number if its inhabitants 269. The soil is clay and chalk, with a kind of rag stone, used only for repairing the roads. The greater part of the land is arable, with about 130 acres of woodland.

The village, which is situated 2 miles W. by N. from Tring, and 6 miles E. by S. from Aylesbury, is pretty and rural, and consists of three farm houses, and a dozen and a half of neat cottages, in couples; each possessing a small garden. The place is watered by a clear rivulet.

Education

Drayton Beauchamp Parish (Pop. 275)

The children have opportunity of attending Schools in adjoining parishes.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Drayton Parslow

Introduction

Church: Holy Trinity

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 1750

Easting & Northing: 483228

Grid Ref SP830280 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Drayton Parslow PARISH Holy Trinity
Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Chapel Lane. First Mentioned: 1830
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1847

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 307
1811 287
1821 372
1831 416
1841 526
1851 490
1861 468
1871 479
1881 473
1891 425
1901 369
1911 333
1921 290
1931 313
1941 N/A
1951 483
1961 406
1971 399
1981 440
1991 538

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Drayton Parslow   Holy Trinity   Baptisms   1559   1868   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Drayton Parslow   Holy Trinity   Marriages   1559   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Drayton Parslow   Holy Trinity   Burials   1559   1898   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 ROGERS BATES KIRK BATES
2 BULL WILLISON BATES KIRK
3 CHANDLER HALL WALDUCK WALDUCK
4 TAYLER BULL STONE STONE
5 PEARSE WELLS TATTAM WILLISON
6 LANE KIRK HIGGS TATTAM
7 THORNTON LORD JACKMAN HIGGS
8 COUKE WALDUCK VICCARS BULL
9 COOKE CUTLER PITKIN JACKMAN
10 HAUKENS FENN MEAD VICCARS

 

description

Description of Drayton Parslow from Sheahan, 1861.

Area, 1,680 acres; population, 468 souls; rateable value, £1,424. The soil is clay and sand, with various loams. The females are employed at straw-plaiting. The village lies 5 miles E. by N. from Winslow, 7 N.W. from Leighton Buzzard, and 5 miles S.W. from Bletchley Railway Station. The situation, on an eminence, is pleasing, and the one long street, of which it is chiefly composed, consists mostly of ancient farm and cottage residences, built of brick and timber, with thatched roofs; but during the last three or four years, several good brick and tile residences have been erected.

The manor house, occupied by a farmer, stands on high ground near the church, and is a large brick building with a double roof and clustered chiminies.

Memories

Before the Second World War, Drayton Parslow had a population of about 300, electricity but no mains water, no main sewer, or street lighting. There was a small shop, a post office and two pubs.

Apart from the half-dozen farms in the parish there were a number of smallholdings and most families had one or more allotments on which they not only grew vegetables but also kept hens. The main sources of employment were agriculture, the brick-works at Newton Longville and the railway at Bletchley.
The biggest landowner was Lord Carrington who allowed a piece of land to be used as a recreation ground which in the summer was home to a thriving and successful cricket team.

Today the population of Drayton Parslow has risen to about 400 and it is still growing. Because of its proximity to Milton Keynes many of the residents work there and some commute to London daily.

On the outskirts of the village is an assortment of buildings which are rapidly becoming derelict. It was known for many years as 'The Camp' and was erected during the Second World War as an extension of the now famous Bletchley Park. It has been altered and extended over the years and used as a prisoner-of-war camp, a hostel for displaced persons working at the brickyard, and Admiralty medical records office and finally a residential training college for Post Office and British Telecom engineers. Drayton Parslow has never had a resident squire and a former villager once remarked that 'every man was his own gaffer' and this is as true today as it was then!

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Education

Drayton Parslow Parish (Pop. 416)

One Daily School, containing 18 males and 4 females, whose instruction is paid for by the parents.

Three Sunday Schools,
one consists of 35 males;
another (commenced 1827), 49 males, (both are of the Established Church);
the other a Baptist School, consists of 26 males and 15 females.

The first Sunday School is supported by a salary of £6 10s. per annum, paid from the parish funds; the other two by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Dunton

Introduction

Church: St Martin

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 1197

Easting & Northing: 482224

Grid Ref SP820240 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Dunton PARISH St Martin
Dodintona NAMES name for Dunton in Domesday Book in 1086
Donington NAMES name for Dunton in 1522 to 1547
Donton NAMES name for Dunton in 1609

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 85
1811 89
1821 98
1831 116
1841 107
1851 98
1861 106
1871 96
1881 80
1891 71
1901 82
1911 89
1921 61
1931 68
1941 N/A
1951 72
1961 76
1971 57
1981 75
1991 95

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Dunton   St Martin   Baptisms   1577   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Dunton   St Martin   Marriages   1575   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Dunton   St Martin   Burials   1577   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 CARTER SIMPSON HARDING HARDING
2 MALLARD BLICK HOGSTON BLICK
3 BURTON DUNCOMBE GREEN MEAD
4 SHEPPARD MEAD MEAD HOGSTON
5 FULLER DUNKLIN DUNKLING GREEN
6 CHAPMAN DUNCOMB BLICK DUNCOMBE
7 ADAMS SHARP SHARPE SIMPSON
8 FRIAR GREEN WATTS CARTER
9 LOVERING COX SHARP SHARP
10 DUNCOMBE FULLER DUNKLIN DUNKLIN

Description

Description of Dunton from Sheahan, 1861.

This parish contains 1,550 acres, all grassland, with the exception of about 70 acres. Population 106,; rateable value £1,551 The soil is a clayey loam, with sand and rubble stone, in alternate strata, near the surface. The village is small, and stands 5 miles S.E. from Winslow, snd 8 miles north from Aylesbury.

1n 1434 the estate belonged to the Hampden family, and it continued with them until about 1730, when it was sold to Sarah Churchill, Duchess-Dowager of Marlborough, who gave it to her grandson the Hon. John Spencer, from whom it passed to his grandson, Earl Spencer. The present Lord of the Manor is Lord Carrington.

A genteel house on the north-west side of the church, now occupied by a farmer, is said to be the Manor House.

The Rectory House, built about eighty years ago, is separated by the main road from the south side of the churchyard, and is surrounded by about an acre of garden ground, and the prospect from the back of the house is delightful.

Education

Dunton Parish (Pop. 116)

One Sunday School (commenced 1827), consisting of 16 males and 9 females, supported by voluntary contributions.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

East Claydon

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Winslow

Size (acres): 2396

Easting & Northing: 473225

Grid Ref SP730250 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
East Claydon PARISH St Mary
Barnwood NAMES name for Bernwood in 1610
Berwood NAMES name for Bernwood in 1529
Bottle NAMES name for Botolph in 1756
Claindone NAMES name for Claydon in the Domesday Book in 1086
Coppesley-hills NAMES name for Coppice Lowhill in 1517
Copsley Hill NAMES name for Coppice Lowhill in 1766
Moncomb (House) NAMES name for Monkomb in 1826
Bernwood PLACE within the parish
Botolph Claydon PLACE within the parish
Coppice Lowhill (Fm) PLACE within the parish
Monkomb (Fm) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 299
1811 309
1821 339
1831 336
1841 378
1851 361
1861 385
1871 376
1881 341
1891 343
1901 336
1911 334
1921 311
1931 276
1941 N/A
1951 268
1961 256
1971 279
1981 305
1991 322

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
East Claydon   St Mary   Baptisms   1583   1888   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
East Claydon   St Mary   Marriages   1576   1838   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
East Claydon   St Mary   Burials   1584   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 STEVENS HOLTON NORMAN NORMAN
2 MILLER SMITH JENNINGS JENNINGS
3 SMITH ROADS HARDING HARDING
4 HUGHES HARDING WHITE ROADS
5 DUNCOMBE NORMAN DANIEL HUGHES
6 HOLLAND MILLER ROADS WHITE
7 FRANCKLIN HOLLAND WEBB SMITH
8 KINGE HUGHES CHAPMAN DANIEL
9 ADAMS RADWELL RAWLINGS HOLTON
10 BENNET BAILEY TOMES WEBB

Description

Claydon House, about seven miles South of the town of Buckingham, had four villages which grew up around it, owned by the Estate, and housing its workers and those traditional craftsmen whose skills were needed to support a farming community. Two of these are the village of East Claydon, and the hamlet of Botolph Claydon. The only church, dedicated to St Mary, dates from the 15 th century, and is in East Claydon. Nevertheless, until recent times, Botolph Claydon was always the larger settlement.
A clock tower, built in 1913, joins—or separates - the two parts. It has one face for each community. To the north side of the tower is East Claydon village school. On the south side of the tower is the Village Hall, which, when it was built by the Verney family, also housed a Public library, well-stocked with books at the family's expense.

In the curve of the Winslow Road in East Claydon is New Farm, which, in former times, was a coaching station. The old coaching track can still be walked as a public footpath.

In both villages a number of thatched cottages remains, though only one (in Botolph Claydon) is still unmodernised and owned by the Estate. The process of modernisation has included the joining together of two or three very small dwellings which were under the same roof, so that now one loses the awareness of the cramped conditions in which families had to live.

The original cottages often used to have a fireplace in the backyard for boiling kettles, and cooking in summer weather. Water, of course, came from the pump or from wells, and main drainage did not arrive until the 1960s.
Since the Second World War, the rapid increase in farm mechanisation, and the consequent decrease in numbers of farm workers, has caused the character of these villages to change. Almost all the houses are now privately owned, and are lived in by people who work elsewhere.
Nevertheless, within the memory of people now in their sixties, the farms were worked with horses, and it was a familiar sight to see one tethered to the railings outside the forge in Botolph Claydon or to see wagon- and cart-wheels awaiting repair outside the wheelwright's shop next door. The Wiggins Brothers carried on this joint enterprise. At the weir in Weir Lane (now an overgrown pond full of bullrushes) the hooves of the working horses were cleaned of the clinging clay from which the district gets its name.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Memories

Schooling in the Claydons in the old days was basic but thorough. Most pupils finished education at 14 when they left the village school; only one of Claydons pupils per year was awarded a place at the Latin School in Buckingham, with likely candidates getting two chances to sit the exams at eleven to twelve years old. However, some parents thought it was "not worth educating a girl" so didn't allow them to sit the exams anyway.
In the very early days pre 1900 the village boys over seven years attended the Park School in Middle Claydon, which meant a walk of two to three miles for the majority of pupils who lived in East and Botolph Claydon. Girls apparently were not catered for at all. If a recalcitrant pupil could not be thrashed by the headmaster the village policeman was sent for! When the East Claydon school was built (1900) the Park School closed and the building was put to use as a library.

The East Claydon school was a traditional Victorian village school which taught up to Standard Seven. Classes were defined by age range, and the same teacher taught that class all subjects. The only relief from this was the month long spell during which older pupils were sent to special classroom facilities at Quainton to do Domestic Science or Woodwork.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "Buckinghamshire Within Living Memory" (1993) and reproduced here with their permission

Notes

Description of East Claydon from Sheahan, 1861.

The parish of East Claydon including the hamlet of Botolph Claydon contains 2,160 acres, and 385 inhabitants. Its rateable value is £3,468. The soil is clayey ans intermixed with strata of gravel and yellow sand. The name of the parish is supposed to be derived form a clayey hill, and its prefix from its relative situation in regard to Middle Claydon and Steeple Claydon.

The village is small, and stands about 2.5 miles S.W. from Winslow. "It is built," writes Dr Lipscomb, " on a raising ground, at the intersection of ancient roads, which having been gradually disused, and at length superseded by the formation of a modern turnpike-road through the neighbouring town of Winslow, are now scarcely to be traced." Pillow lace is still worked here by the women and children.

Education

East Claydon with Bottle Claydon Parish (Pop. 336)

One Infant School (commenced 1827), in which are about 40 children of both sexes, partly supported by subscription and partly by payments from the children.

One Sunday School, for this and the parish of Middle Claydon, wherein 100 children receive gratuitous instruction.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Edgcott

Introduction

Church: St Michael

Hundred: Buckingham

Poor Law District: Buckingham

Size (acres): 1140

Easting & Northing: 467222

Grid Ref SP670220 Click to see map

Names

Places

 

NameTypeNote
Edgcott PARISH St Michael
Achecote NAMES name for Edgcott in Domesday Book in 1086
Edgecote NAMES name for Edgcott in 1598
Eggcotte NAMES name for Edgcott in 1526
Independent NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1832
Primitive Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1840

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 122
1811 121
1821 160
1831 180
1841 195
1851 193
1861 182
1871 224
1881 187
1891 150
1901 136
1911 127
1921 100
1931 90
1941 N/A
1951 117
1961 143
1971 128
1981 176
1991 257

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Edgcott   St Michael   Baptisms   1845   1867   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Edgcott   St Michael   Baptisms   1538   1837   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Edgcott   St Michael   Marriages   1845   1853   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Edgcott   St Michael   Marriages   1539   1834   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Edgcott   St Michael   Burials   1845   1867   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Edgcott   St Michael   Burials   1539   1837   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

Surnames

 

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 MASON HOLT HOLT HOLT
2 ROGERS KIBBLE BUTLER HUGHES
3 HEWES FRANKLIN SPENCER BUTLER
4 CLARKE SARE HUGHES SPENCER
5 HUGHES CROOK HODGES KIBBLE
6 NORRIS BURGES BUTTLER HODGES
7 MATHEW WATSON JUSTICE BUTTLER
8 MARTIN HUGHES CAWCUTT MASON
9 GOODGAME MARKHAM MARKHAM ROGERS
10 GOODGAM ROGERS BEASLEY MARKHAM

Description

Description of Edgcott from Sheahan, 1861.

This is a small parish of 650 acres and 182 inhabitants. Rateable value, £1,257. "The marsh, on the verge of which, eastward, the village stands," writes Lipscomb, "have probably imparted to it its name." The soil is clayey.

The village is small and lies in a hollow, 7 miles E. from Bicester, and 8 miles S. from Buckingham.

The Manor House, an ancient building of brick, situated on an elevated spot on the south side of the church, is at present in the occupation of Mr. William Cross, farmer.

The Rectory, valued in the King's Books at £11 12s. 8d., is now returned at £210 per annum. The tithes were commuted for about 200 acres of land at the inclosure of the parish. Patron, the Lord of the Manor; Rector, Rev. Cloudesley Dewar Bullock Marsham. It is intended shortly to build a Rectory House.

There is an Independent chapel in the parish.

Education

Edgcott Parish (Pop. 180)

One Day and Sunday School (commenced 1827), consisting of about 12 children of both sexes, who are instructed at the expense of their parents.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Edlesborough

Introduction

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Cottesloe

Poor Law District: Leighton Buzzard

Size (acres): 4647

Easting & Northing: 497219

Grid Ref SP970190 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Edlesborough PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Eddinberge NAMES name for Edlesborough in Domesday Book in 1086
Edgborough NAMES name for Edlesborough in 1716
Edgeborough NAMES name for Edlesborough in 1655
Edysborogh NAMES name for Edlesborough in 1535
Ringshal NAMES name for Ringshall in 1766
Independent NON-CONFORMIST Chalkshire Chapel. First Mentioned: 1836
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST Dagnall. First Mentioned: 1800
Particular Baptist NON-CONFORMIST Northall. First Mentioned: 1810
Weslyan NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1858
Dagnall PLACE within the parish
Hudnall PLACE within the parish
Northall PLACE within the parish
Ringshall (Part) PLACE within the parish
St. Margarets (Part) PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 997
1811 1146
1821 1378
1831 1490
1841 1722
1851 1838
1861 1671
1871 1814
1881 1598
1891 1448
1901 1099
1911 916
1921 898
1931 885
1941 N/A
1951 1117
1961 1334
1971 1556
1981 2401
1991 2614

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Edlesborough   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1567   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Edlesborough   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1568   1975   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Edlesborough   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1567   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Edlesborough   Baptist   Burials   1845   1870   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

School

School Records Project

Place   School Type   Name   Start Year   End Year   Indexed   Document Type
    Edlesborough         Edlesborough     1874     1891     Yes     Logbook
    Edlesborough         Edlesborough     1891     1900     Yes     Logbook
    Edlesborough         Edlesborough     1900     1929     Yes     Logbook
    Edlesborough - Not available     Minute Book     Edlesborough     1922     1946     Yes     Minute Book
    Edlesborough - Not available         Edlesborough     1930     1980     Yes     Logbook

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 EDGE GINGER JANES JANES
2 CHURCH JANES SMITH GINGER
3 ROBERTS CHESHIRE SEAR SMITH
4 RUSSELL DEAN MEAD SEAR
5 KIDGELL STANBRIDGE COOK COOK
6 STANBRIDGE SEAR ROGERS MEAD
7 PERRY WELLS BATES COSTIN
8 CLARKE HAWKINS IMPEY STANBRIDGE
9 BRUGIS KING GINGER FOWLER
10 COBB HUMPHREY COSTIN ROGERS

Description


'What I spent I had,
 What I gave I have,
What I refused I am being punished for,
 What I kept I have lost.'

So says the unique Rose Brass of Edlesborough church, which stands high on a chalk mound overlooking the Vale of Aylesbury and Ivinghoe Beacon. The mound may or not be an ancient British burial mound, but the view from it is superb.

Below the church is a 16th century tithe barn, which by its size, 180 feet long, shows how flourishing Edlesborough must once have been. Originally thatched, now tiled with mellow peg-tiles, its timber-framed walls in-filled with brick and Totternhoe clunch from the village next-door-but-one, it is being carefully restored to fit its new role as offices. Church Farm, its host, is farmed from outside, and the buildings will be houses. The farm has a spring-fed moat inside which is a dove-cote, and round the moat still rides the ghost of Jack the Leather, 'Old Leather Breeches', a highwayman who was dragged from his hiding place in the farm stables to the gibbet at the Beacon. While in hiding his only exercise had been at night, riding the farm horses round the moat, and the lathered horses were spotted one morning by the soldiers sent to find him.

The moat may have surrounded a monastic building. There is certainly a stew pond and fish trap in the grounds of the school next door, which the children are hoping to restore. Let us hope the ghost enjoys his renovated environment. A few yards further along the road, in the grounds of the Old Vicarage, another ghost, that of a gardener murdered in a brawl between rival households, must hear the sounds of children at play and be reminded of happier times.
The ghost of Dick Turpin only frequents the village at night. He had a secret hide-out at Butler's Manor at Northall, where a now blocked up window once commanded a view of laden stage coaches passing Ivinghoe Beacon. There was plenty of time for him then to ride across country to hold up the coach at the old road at Dunstable. He rides now of a dark night along the narrow road between the church and the Tring Road.

The village green, a large, well-laundered open space with football pitches, cricket table, tennis courts and children's swings was once gated to stop grazing animals escaping. These grazing rights were held by those living in the surrounding cottages. These are still standing behind the newer houses which were built after the Enclosure Act took effect in Edlesborough in 1855. The shape of the old common land can still be seen, since the cottagers were allowed to plant and prune damson trees local to the district on the common to a depth of 40 ft, and forward of this 40 ft the new roads were built. In a good year the damsons, sold for dye-making and sent off from Stanbridgeford Station on the train called the Dunstable Flyer, went far to helping a family through the winter. In the last century Edlesborough was a poor village and fast depopulating, from 1,371 in 1891 to 898 in 1921. There were plenty to make full use of the 864 41b loaves provided yearly by Rendell’s 16th century charity.

The 19th century village was owned largely by the Ashridge Estate. Houses were painted in the Ashridge colour of dark maroon brown with identical wooden fences in front. These were the first things to be changed when houses passed into private ownership, the way that nowadays the council house gains a porch and a new front door. Agriculture for the menfolk was supplemented by the women and children's wages from straw plaiting for the Luton hat industry, and one of the new victorian houses had a room for a plait school above the archway to its stable. In 1895, the new Parish Council consisted of five farmers, one farmer and dealer, one plait merchant, a labourer and a carpenter. Now Manor Farm is the last to be farmed by a farmer living in the village farmhouse surrounded by its buildings. Charity Farm, buildings now houses, has the maladjusted ghost of a farmworker. His threshing floor has been lowered to form a new house level, but he remains at the old height and is only ever half seen.

The mill, perhaps on the site of the one mentioned in the Domesday Book, grinds corn no longer, though its machinery ornaments the sitting room of the elegant house it has become. The Rat and Sparrow Club of 1917, helping the First World War effort, by destroying the vermin which preyed on the food supply faded away, though sparrow pie was still being eaten in the 1940s, the Have-a-Go club, which bought much of the children's play equipment too has gone.

The hamlet of Northall, part of Edlesborough parish, once had its own school which was closed in 1905. The two pubs, The Swan and The Village Green Inn, now called The Northall Inn, are still there. A smithy, where horses were shod and iron household items were repaired closed in the early 1930s, as did the wheelwright, carpenter and undertaker, who used to make his own coffins but hired the carriages from Dunstable. A family baker retired in 1953 and the village shop closed in 1983.

But Edlesborough still has a thriving sense of community; good communications though no industry. There are no famous people among us, our recent claim to notoriety through the Fox rapist is best forgotten, but the school is full again and the village grows and flourishes.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Dagnall

Dagnall was, and still is, one of the two hamlets in the Parish of Edlesborough. The seven farms that surrounded the village, together with nineteen cottages, the Mission Church and the parsonage, belonged to the Ashridge estate. Lord Brownlow was responsible for the curate's living.
All the properties situated between the allotment gardens and the parsonage, and land stretching back to the Studham Road, were owned by Messrs Batchelor Brothers. Within the Batchelor's property were a brewery, a malthouse, piggeries, and cottages for those employed at the brewery. There was also a small private chapel, as a result of some dispute with the Methodists and the Church of England. The Batchelors' private house was situated at the northwest end of the village. Near the entrance gate was a building called 'The Tramp Ward' that provided shelter for one night for any tramp on his wanderings. In the morning he was given a drink of small beer at the brewery before continuing his journey.

Beer was also brewed at the Cross Keys public house for sale in the house and for customers requiring larger quantities in pins, firkins and larger barrels. (Farmers provided beer for their men during harvest, haymaking and threshing.)
There were three other public houses in the village, but one, the Golden Rule, only had a six-day licence.

The main roads were little better than cart tracks, and tar roads were unknown until the early 1920's. The iron tyres of the farm carts would sink into the surface of the road to a depth of four or five inches. Footways on the roadside were in the centre of the grass verges and became very muddy during the winter months.

The doctor came from Dunstable, five miles away, sometimes on horseback, at other times in a brougham driven by a coachman. Medicines were dispensed by the doctor himself and left to be collected from an open window of his dispensary—often by someone travelling on foot to Dunstable.

The two bakeries in the village delivered to the door daily, as well as to neighbouring villages. Several butchers from other villages delivered to Dagnall in their traders' carts drawn by horse or pony. These carts were totally enclosed. Access to the goods was obtained by lowering the tailboard on chains, and the tailboard then became the cutting-up block. Spring balance scales hung from an arm extended from the top of the cart.

A four-wheeled horse trolley, laden with hardware, paraffin, candles and almost anything you cared to ask for, came round once a week. The draper brought his wares in a tilted cart, and from him mothers would buy yards of shirting to make shirts for their men folk.

Milk, however, was not delivered to the door for a good number of years. Skim milk was collected direct from the farm and cost about a halfpenny a pint. The cream from this milk was made into butter.

A sub-post office and general shop catered for most needs, and there was also a general shop attached to one of the public houses. The postman delivered the mail from Little Gaddesden, either by bicycle or on foot.

The mains water supply is comparatively recent. Before its arrival drinking water had to be raised from the wells some fifty feet in depth. Rain water from the house roofs was stored in underground tanks and used for washing. There was, of course, no main drainage, and toilets were usually situated at the far end of the garden. Sinks and drains discharged into dumb wells that allowed the water to soak into the chalk.

The Mission Church was a church on Sundays and a school during the week—until the new school opened on 11 January 1909. The single bell at the church summoned the congregation to worship and the boys and girls to school. One Sunday the churchwarden, who was very deaf, was tugging away at the bell-rope when the clanger parted company with the bell. Not being too sure if his hearing had deteriorated further, the churchwarden continued to ring. When the village blacksmith entered the church the churchwarden asked him if the bell was still ringing. The blacksmith shook his head, and the bell has remained silent until this day.

Written the  husband of Gladys Putman, Dagnall

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Education

Edlesborough Parish, including the Hamlets of Dagnall, Hudnall, and Northall,
(Pop. 1,490)

One Daily School (commenced 1827), wherein about 20 males are instructed at the expense of their parents.

Two Sunday Schools, in one, supported by the Vicar, from 80 to 100 children of both sexes are instructed ; the other is maintained by Dissenters, and consists of about 50 children.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Notes

Description of Edlesborough from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

Edlesborough includes the hamlets of Dagnall, Hudnall, and Northall, as well as part of the hamlet of Horton; and is one of the most extensive parishes in Bucks. It lies on the eastern verge of the county on the borders of Hertfordshire, towards the south. The parish is, owing to its peculiar shape, more than sixteen in circumference. Its area is 4,579 acres; population, 1,665 souls. The rateable value of the entire parish is £6,550.

The village of Edlesborough or Edgebro' is chiefly built round a "Green" of about 30 acres, which until now had been an unenclosed common, upon which the older inhabitants had the right of pasture; but which is, at present (1861), together with about 500 acres of other common land in the parish, being enclosed. The place is distant 3 miles S.W. from Dunstable; and 3 miles N.E. from Ivinghoe. The Church stands on a hill west of the village.

 

Fleet Marston

Introduction

Church: St Mary the Virgin

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 934

Easting & Northing: 477216

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Fleet Marston PARISH St Mary the Virgin
Fleet Masson NAMES name for Fleet Marston in 1690
Fletemarston NAMES name for Fleet Marston in 1509
Flittmarston NAMES name for Fleet Marston in 1526
Merstone NAMES name for Marston in Domesday Book in 1086
fflet marson NAMES name for Fleet Marston in 1670

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 40
1811 46
1821 43
1831 41
1841 38
1851 30
1861 23
1871 37
1881 27
1891 51
1901 53
1911 50
1921 42
1931 37
1941 N/A
1951 36
1961 58
1971 53
1981 41
1991 23

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Fleet Marston   St Mary the Virgin   Baptisms   1631   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Fleet Marston   St Mary the Virgin   Marriages   1630   1907   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Fleet Marston   St Mary the Virgin   Burials   1630   1904   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 WARNER WOODMAN SANDERS SANDERS
2 SMITH DAVIS SOUTHAM WOODMAN
3 BASSETT SANDERS SIMONS DAVIS
4 HARRISON ADAMS RIDGWAY SOUTHAM
5 COLLINS GRACE DAVIS SIMONS
6 ADAMS DELL TERRY RIDGWAY
7 IVATS BOWDEN SAUNDERS GRACE
8 CLARKE MARKHAM RICHARDSON ADAMS
9 CANNON IVATTS WOODMAN WARNER
10 ALLEN HOW HOWSE SAUNDERS

Description

Description of Fleet Marston from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

Marston, Merston, Mershton, or Meerston, had its name from its situation at the outlet or drain of marshy ground, lying between the hills of Quainton and Pitchcott. Fleet Marston was at one extremity of the meer, moor, or marsh (now converted into meadow and pasture), and North Marston on the other. The area of Fleet Marston is 929 acres; population, 30; rateable value, £1,503. The soil is a black loam with gravel based on blue clay. There is no village, but the place is 3 miles distant from Aylesbury, N.W. by W.

Medmenham Abbey had lands in Flete Marston and Blaggrove but their exact situation is not known

The living is a Rectory, rated at £8 2s. 8.5d. The advowson was appendant to the manor until about the beginning of the present century. The patronage is at present vested in the family of Humphries, and the Rector is the Rev. H, Wanklyn. The tithes hav been commuted for £200.

The Rectory House has been converted into two tenements, and these, together with a farm house, constitute the parish.

Education

Fleet Marston Parish (Pop. 41)

No School in the parish.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

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