Bradenham

Introduction

Bradenham Parish

Church: St Botolph

Hundred: Desborough

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres): 996

Easting & Northing: 482197

Grid Ref SU820970 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Bradenham PARISH St Botolph
Bradeham NAMES name for Bradenham in Domesday Book in 1086
Bradenhamme NAMES name for Bradenham in 1535
Independent NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: ?. Recorded in 1851 religious census
Smallden PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 170
1811 181
1821 220
1831 263
1841 226
1851 138
1861 185
1871 169
1881 183
1891 152
1901 154
1911 142
1921 132
1931 134
1941 N/A
1951 652
1961 724
1971 775
1981 935
1991 869

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Bradenham   St Botolph   Baptisms   1590   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Bradenham   St Botolph   Marriages   1590   1906   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Bradenham   St Botolph   Burials   1601   1905   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 LOVEDAY LACEY LACEY LACEY
2 DARVOLL WINGROVE STALLWOOD WINGROVE
3 WINTER KING KENNEDY KING
4 WINGROVE PARISH GOODCHILD STALLWOOD
5 SHRIMPTON BILLING WOOSTER KENNEDY
6 ALICE LEE KING SMITH
7 CARTER FINCH BALL GOODCHILD
8 RATCLIFFE WHITBOURNE GOODEARL WINTER
9 EAST BELSON SMITH WOOSTER
10 GUNNELL STONE BROWN BALL

 

Notes

I was born, as was my mother before me, at the Bradenham Bradenham Red Lion. My grandmother died when my mother was eighteen years old so she and my grandfather ran the pub until he died and then my father took it over.
Bradenham is now a National Trust Village but before that it was preserved as an old Manor holding by the Graves family.


The Graves family were very domineering folk. The Reverend Graves was strict with the villagers about attending church on Sundays and woe betide any parishioner who failed to turn up for service. When he died, his son had the living; at his death his widow had a life interest. Her maiden name was Tempest and she reverted to that as widow after the death of her two brothers in the 1914-18 War, which made her the last of her line. Mrs Tempest vigorously opposed any change in the village and it is consequently much the same as in its feudal days. Only recently has one house been erected—the first in over a hundred years. She lost the battle with the Air Ministry, however, and land on the outskirts of the village was compul-sorily purchased in May 1940, to build what was then Bomber Command Headquarters. She did force through certain provisions, principally that no buildings or overhead wires were to intrude on the line of the Queen's Ride which was a path cut through the woods and countryside for the use of Queen Elizabeth I when she came to visit the Manor.

Another old house on the Common is Admiral Silver's House. After the death of Miss Silver, the last of that line, the Hudson family from West Wycombe rented the property from The National Trust and made it into the very beautiful house it is today. They were carvers by profession and in addition to carvings in the house made the lovely interior door of St. Botolph's church. The church is separated only by a wall from the old Elizabethan Manor House.

When I was young Mr Ball, the blacksmith, was also the verger of the church.
Bradenham held the prettiest Garland Day for miles around on May Day. The garland of fresh flowers was always made by Mrs Brown, the wife of the Keeper of the Woods, who only earned £1 a week to keep a wife and family of seven children. On Garland Day, all the children wore their most colourful clothes and after the May Revels went out singing, first to the Manor House and then to the workhouse at Saunderton. We also danced around a Maypole at the fete held in the Manor grounds every summer.

Dora Smith, Sands

Extracted from 'A Pattern Hundreds' (1975) and reproduced with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Description

Desciption of Bradenham from Sheahan in 1861

The parish of Bradenham contains 1,001 acres, and 182 inhabitants. The soil is chalk and flint. The village, which is situated 4 mile N.W. from High Wycombe, is built around a small green of a rural character. At the upper end of it, and approached through lofty iron gates, is the Manor House, backed by extensive woods; and close to the mansion is the church.

The Manor House is best known as the residence for many years of Isaac Disraeli Esq., D.C.L, was the descendant of a Hebrew family which flourished in Spain, and after in Italy. His father Benjamin Disraeli, settled in England in 1748, as a Venetian merchant, and being successful in his affairs retired from business, while yet in middle life to Enfield, where he died in 1817aged 90 years.

Education

Bradenham Parish (Pop. 263)

One Sunday School, with 28 males and 30 females; supported by the Rev. T. King.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

Bledlow

Introduction

Church: Holy Trinity

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres): 4169

Easting & Northing: 477202

Grid Ref SP770020 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Bledlow PARISH Holy Trinity
Shingles Fm NAMES name for Shimmell's Farm in 1826
Independent NON-CONFORMIST Church End. First Mentioned: 1820
Bledlow Cross PLACE within the parish
Callow Down PLACE within the parish
Common Leys PLACE within the parish
Drewells (lost) PLACE within the parish
Forty Green PLACE within the parish
Olive Green PLACE within the parish
Pitch Green PLACE within the parish
Shimmels PLACE within the parish
The Ford PLACE within the parish
The Lyde PLACE within the parish
Winnall PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 917
1811 931
1821 1050
1831 1135
1841 1205
1851 1202
1861 1189
1871 1170
1881 1070
1891 978
1901 854
1911 954
1921 879
1931 925
1941 N/A
1951 1679
1961 1871
1971 1984
1981 2134
1991 2000

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Bledlow   Holy Trinity   Baptisms   1590   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Bledlow   Holy Trinity   Marriages   1592   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Bledlow   Holy Trinity   Burials   1591   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 STEVENS STEVENS SMITH STEVENS
2 SMITH EUSTACE BROOKS SMITH
3 SALE SALE STEVENS BROOKS
4 COSTARD TRIPP BRITNELL SALE
5 RAUNCE PRATT AVERY BRITNELL
6 TOWNE HOLT KEEN PRATT
7 BIGGE SMITH ALLEN GOMME
8 STEEVENS TURNER FOLLEY AVERY
9 CLARKE HARRIS WHITE EUSTACE
10 RANCE GOMME GOMME KEEN

Description

Bledlow is a conservation village and thus retains much of its original pattern. It now includes the hamlets of Skittle Green, Forty Green, Holly Green and Pitch Green all of which lie north of the busy B4009, the Lower Icknield Way.
Though the origins of the village can be traced to the 10th century, there is clear evidence of earlier occupation. Close to the Upper Icknield Way is a Bronze Age barrow known locally as 'The Cop' which was excavated in 1938. One mile south of the village is Bledlow Cross, carved out of the Chiltern Ridge by the Anglo-Saxons and, with its neighbour Whiteleaf Cross, are the only turf-cut crosses in the country.

After the Norman Conquest, William I granted the Manor of Bledlow to his half-brother Robert, who held it in 1086. In the reign of Henry VI it was granted to Eton College but in 1650 James Blanck became owner and he built the original Manor House. Records show that the present Manor was sold in 1801 to Lord Carrington whose successor holds it at the present day.
The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Chapel Lane was built in 1869. In 1913 a schoolroom was added on reclaimed marshland where older residents of Bledlow can recall skating on frozen water. The Chapel provides the village with its Sunday School attended by many young children in the schoolroom.
The main Village School was built in 1868 and celebrated its centenary before closure in 1973 and subsequent demolition in 1984. Miss E. M. Folley had almost 52 years association with the school as both pupil and teacher. Present primary children must travel some 2 miles to Longwick. Five new flint and brick houses now stand on the site of the old school.

Bledlow has many listed buildings. The 16th century timber framed houses built near the church show the decorative Elizabethan brick herringboning but 'The Cottage' in West Lane is reputed to be the oldest house in the village of ancient cruck construction. It was once 2 cottages, the older of which is some 600 years old.

Now, although the old names of Heybourn, Gomme and Tappin are still here, most residents are commuters either to London, High Wycombe or Aylesbury. Like many villages it has become a haven, of rural living rather than a bustling village where people once were born, lived, worked and died; where the village was a self-sufficient entity within its own community.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

 

Memories

Bledlow Station was opened at the beginning of 1864. The first Station Master was Mr John Greenaway; his son kept the Seven Stars public house opposite and had seven children. The pub was quite small, so every night beds were set up in the station waiting room for some of the children and removed before the first passenger train arrived in the morning.
In those days at Bledlow there were thirty-two trains a day, the station being manned by the master and two porters. Goods sent from the station were varied and in large quantities, ranging from two tons of Aylesbury ducks a week during the season to trawler blocks from James Walker's timber mills at Longwick which amounted to some two hundred tons a week, and milk from farmers in Bledlow and Henton. Many trucks of wood were unloaded at Bledlow and paper in large quantities sent in and out from the paper mills. In those days, rags were chopped at nearby North Mill in preparation for paper making at the Paper Mills. Then on a very sad day in January 1963, the station was closed after a busy and useful life of ninety-nine years. The line is still used to supply Thame Petrol Depot, B.P. and Shell.

J. Walker, Bledlow

Extracted from 'A Pattern of Hundreds'(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes

Description of Bledlow from Kelly's Directory 1883

Bledlow is a parish within the parliamentary borough of Aylesbury, in the hundred of Aylesbury, union of Wycombe, county court district of High Wycombe.

The area of the parish is 4,130 acres and have a rateable value of £4,414; the population in 1881, including Bledlow Ridge, Pitch Green, and Rout's Green was 1,070. Lord Carrington and Eton College are lords of the manor. The principle landowners are Lord Carrington, Eton College, Mrs Heybourn, Thomas Taylor, James Britnell, William Clarke, Henry Gibbons and Edward Crough Esqrs.

Education

Bledlow with Bledlow-ridge Parish (Pop. 1,135)

One Boarding School, in which about 4 females are educated at the expense of their parents.

Three Sunday Schools, consisting of 64 males and 76 females, chiefly supported by the Vicar and his friends; there are also Eight Lace Schools, containing about 75 children, many of whom are taught to read at the expense of their parents.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.


Bledlow Ridge

Introduction

Bledlow Ridge Parish

Church: St Paul

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 479198

Grid Ref SP790980 Click to see map

Names


Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Bledlow Ridge PARISH St Paul
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: 1834

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Bledlow Ridge   St Paul   Baptisms   1868   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Bledlow Ridge   St Paul   Marriages   1868   1902   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Bledlow Ridge   St Paul   Burials   1869   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 CAREY RANCE BROOKS BROOKS
2 SALE BUTLER SMITH SMITH
3 WESTON STYLE BRITNELL BRITNELL
4 STONE STEVENS KEEN KEEN
5 SMITH BROOKS MARTIN MARTIN
6 RAUNCE BRITNELL EGGLETON EGGLETON
7 RANCE SMITH NEWELL NEWELL
8 MALLERY HILL AVERY STEVENS
9 CLARKE MORRIS FEASEY BUTLER
10 BRAITHWAIT NEWELL STEVENS AVERY

 

 

Notes

At Bledlow Ridge forty years ago the dwellings were few and far between, often tucked away down a side lane, and the population was little more than four hundred. Cattle and sheep grazed serenely and safely on neat grass verges.
It was a marvellously tidy place, conservation being practised more than it was preached in those days. Although there was no organised refuse collection, no unsightly rubbish littered the countryside and leaving paper litter was a punishable offence for the reason that it might blow about and frighten horses and bring some poor creature to an untimely end. All waste material usually found its way back to the land. No milk bottle problem existed either for, armed with a milk jug, one went to the nearest farm and queued at the dairy door after the morning or evening milking.

Water was a valuable commodity. Time was when on these hills rain water was the only source of supply and was stored in large underground tanks usually miscalled 'wells'. For watering of cattle most farmers relied on ponds. The hard water which now gushes through Bledlow Ridge taps certainly has its recommendations. The quality of tank water varied to a great extent; it was assumed that the rain itself was pure, but its collection and after-care were a different matter. A time of drought was deemed the best for descending to the bottom of a tank to remove any remaining water, and an amazing assortment of debris would have collected there. The concrete lining was thoroughly wiped, all down-pipes, catch pits and guttering cleaned out and examined. Then one waited for the rain. Thunder rains were usually impregnated with dirt which had to settle before use. Rain off a galvanised tin roof was cleanest and quickly collected. Second best was rain from slates or tiles but that collected from thatching was usually discoloured and difficult to catch efficiently. For this reason families in thatched cottages drank surface water for preference. There was no drainage. Only a few cottages had sinks in the kitchen. Most cottages had sizeable gardens and usually every bit was put to practical use. Often pigs were kept, either to sell or for the household. Pig-keeping helped to keep up the cycle of conservation in the garden. No chemical other than lime was applied to the soil.
Monday morning early found the few industries of the village already working. The blacksmith at The Old Forge was clanging at his anvil, the chair bodger was at his pole lathe, the farm labourer leading his team of horses, the chimney sweep with tackle in his pony-drawn cart, schoolchildren, packets of lunch sandwiches in hand, walking the lanes to school. At his last was the shoe-maker, locally called a 'snob'.
With the population of Bledlow Ridge at now more than one thousand many of the picturesque thatched  and flint cottages have disappeared, modern homes having taken their place, and much of the pasture has been built upon. Gone too is the old windmill, but happily the Mill House, three hundred years old, still remains a sturdy structure, reminder of a former way of life. Gone too is a vast wild cherry tree of tremendous girth that stood at the corner of a lane dwarfing a cottage beneath it.

D. Rogers, Bledlow Ridge

Extracted from 'A Pattern of Hundreds'(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes

Notes


Bledlow Ridge is a long stretch of roadway that winds up a steep ascent from West Wycombe over the Chiltern Hills towards Oxfordshire. It is part of the ancient parish of Bledlow and gets a mention in the Domesday Book. The name means 'Bloody Hill' and commemorates a fierce battle between the Danes and the Saxons. It goes further back into history than that. Impressions exist of hut circles and the occasional fragments of pottery and implements, which together with the nearness of the Icknield Way, indicate a Romano-British settlement of around 300 BC. From time to time, iron cannon balls, silver shoe buckles and coin of the early Stuart kings are unearthed, evidence of a battle between the Royalists and the Roundheads in the Civil War and the famous victory for the Royalists at Chinnor in 1643.

Bledlow Ridge was mostly common land in those days. On the common stood an Elizabethan farmhouse where Cromwell stabled his horse in one of the adjoining barns. As recently as the last couple of decades, a sword of the period was discovered concealed in the wide chimney of an open fireplace. Pankridge now faces onto a busy road, no longer a farm but an integral part of the village and centre of many social gatherings.

In 1917, Loxborough House at the top of Loxborough Hill, once regarded as the Manor House, was acquired by a Mr Henry O'Reilly Stevens, the maker of the famous Stevens Ink. The grounds were a popular venue for garden parties and similar festivities that raised money for village needs. By this means a Parish Institute was built.

There are houses on the Ridge that date from over 300 years ago. Among these was The Old Mansion noted for a large loft where fleeces were stored for collection by woolpack men who plied their trade between Wantage and London. Three of these nomadic people named Brooks squatted on nearby land called The Scrubbs. Several families all bearing the same name was the result, making it necessary to distinguish them by adding the name of their dwelling or occupation. Some had Bible names — Able, Isaac and even Moses. The name 'The City' mystifies newcomers. There are two explanations: refugees fleeing from the City of London sought protection there from the Great Plague of 1666 or it was a hideout for a City Guild with good reason to escape from the Bow Street Runners.

Changes took place at The Old Mansion in 1918 when Sir William and Lady Lister bought it as a country residence. A nephew of Lord Lister of antiseptics fame, Sir William was consulting oculist to King George V and surgeon oculist to His Majesty's Household. During the Second World War, Sir William developed a portable electro-magnetic device for removing foreign bodies from the eye.
Bledlow Ridge W.I. has earned a place in local history for its phenomenal jam making record during the Second World War. They produced 25 cwt. from a glut of cottage garden grown greengages the like of which had never been known before or since. Their efforts received high praise from the County.

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description from Sheahan, 1861. With other notes.

Bledlow Ridge is a high hill, 3.5 miles from the parish church, on the south side. It extends five or six miles in length, having detached farmhouses on side of it. The prospects from this "ridge" are extensive.

A small chapel of ease was erected in this hamlet in 1801; and was rebuilt on a larger scale in 1834. There is a Wesleyian Chapel, built in 1834, on a plot of land given by Robert, Lord Carington.

Many females in Bledlow Ridge find employment by making cotton and blonde lace by hand, on pillows.

Loxborough House, Chinnor Road, south of Bledlow Ridge. Was a hunting lodge built about 1800 for the Dashwoods of West Wycombe.

Education

Bledlow with Bledlow Ridge Parish (Pop. 1,135)

One Boarding School, in which about 4 females are educated at the expense of their parents.
 
Three Sunday Schools, consisting of 64 males and 76 females, chiefly supported by the Vicar and his friends; there are also Eight Lace Schools, containing about 75 children, many of whom are taught to read at the expense of their parents.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

Cadmore End

Introduction

Cadmore End Parish

Church: St Mary-le-Moor

Hundred: Desborough

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres):

Easting & Northing: 478192

Grid Ref SU780920 Click to see map


Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Cadmore End PARISH St Mary-le-Moor

 

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Cadmore End   St Mary-le-Moor   Baptisms   1786   1912   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Cadmore End   St Mary-le-Moor   Marriages   1852   1901   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
Cadmore End   St Mary-le-Moor   Burials   1852   1973   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 MESSENGER LACEY PLUMRIDGE PLUMRIDGE
2 MESSINGER TAYLOR AYRES AYRES
3 YOUNG PLUMRIDGE OXLADE OXLADE
4 WYATT EAST DRUCE DRUCE
5 WRIGHT MESSENGER NEWELL BARLOW
6 WORTON DORMER BARLOW NEWELL
7 WOODMAN SHEPHERD SMITH SMITH
8 WOODBRIDGE PLOMER BASTON BASTON
9 WIXON PISEY ATKINS ATKINS
10 WITNEY MOLE JOHNSON JOHNSON

 

Description

Description of Cadmore End

Cadmore End, with Lewknor-up-Hill, is an ecclesiastical parish formed April 2nd, 1852, out of portions of the parishes of Fingest, in the county of Buckingham, and the civil parishes of Lewknor and Stokenchurch, in the county of Oxon, but by the County of Buckingham (Stokenchurch) Order, 1895, the Oxfordshire portion was, March 31, 1896, transferred to Bucks, and the whole is now in the latter county. It is 4 miles south-west from West Wycombe station, on the Princes Risborough and Maidenhead section of the Great Western Railway, 8.5 south-east from Watlington terminal station on a branch of the same line from Princes Risborough, and 5.5 north-west from Great Marlow, in the Wycombe Division of the county of Buckinghamshire, chiefly in the hundred of Lewknor, and in the petty sessional division, rural district, county court district and rural deanery of Wycombe.

The church of St. Mary-le-Moor, erected in 1851, in place of the little church at Ackhampstead, commonly called "The Moor Chapel " and then taken down, is a small building of flint with Bath stone quoins and dressings, in the Early English style, consisting of chancel, nave, south porch, vestry and a small western turret containing one bell: all the windows are stained.

Lord Paramoor P.C., K.C.V.O., K.C., is lord of the manor and chief landowner. The soil is flinty and friable sand with chalk and clay. The chief crops are wheat, barley and oats. The population in 1921 was 284.

 

Notes

Cadmore End is a small quiet hamlet between Lane End and Stokenchurch. Unfortunately when the M40 motorway was built it divided the village into two, but this does not seem to detract from the beauty around it.
As Cadmore End is conveniently situated to Heathrow Airport via the M4 Motorway, we have our share of pilots living here. Most families work very locally or commute to London by train from High Wycombe.

There are many walks nearby including the old 'woolpack track' to Hambleden and the Thames and we get people taking the 'walks from the car' at weekends.
The Smock windmill which has been restored and used as a 'cottage' can be seen over the trees from this track. This was used in the film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.

There are old brickworks on one side of Cadmore Common but they have now been disused for many years.
The social life revolves around the village green cricket club, The Blue Flag and The Ship public houses, the church and school.


Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Ellesborough

Introduction

Ellesborough Parish

Church: St Peter and St Paul

Hundred: Aylesbury

Poor Law District: Wycombe

Size (acres): 3595

Easting & Northing: 483206

Grid Ref SP830060 Click to see map


Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Ellesborough PARISH St Peter and St Paul
Ellesborowghe NAMES name for Ellesborough in 1580
Ellysburgh NAMES name for Ellesborough in 1509
Esenberge NAMES name for Ellesborough at Domesday Book in 1086
Turwick NAMES name for Terrick in 1825
Aspley PLACE within the parish
Beacon Hill PLACE within the parish
Buckmore End PLACE within the parish
Busheylays PLACE within the parish
Butlers Cross PLACE within the parish
Chalkshire PLACE within the parish
Chequers (Part) PLACE within the parish
Coombs (Part) PLACE within the parish
Dunsmore (Part) PLACE within the parish
Nash Lee PLACE within the parish
North Lee PLACE within the parish
Terrick PLACE within the parish
Whorley Wood PLACE within the parish
Widnell Wood PLACE within the parish

 

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 480
1811 469
1821 581
1831 665
1841 708
1851 782
1861 724
1871 703
1881 608
1891 641
1901 577
1911 519
1921 590
1931 628
1941 N/A
1951 828
1961 819
1971 800
1981 827
1991 771

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Ellesborough   St Peter & St Paul   Baptisms   1603   1903   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Ellesborough   St Peter & St Paul   Marriages   1575   1837   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available
Ellesborough   St Peter & St Paul   Burials   1603   1909   Yes,
click here
 
Yes,
click here
 
Not available

 

Surnames

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 SMITH ALLEN FLITNEY ALLEN
2 NEIGHBOUR SMITH ELDRIDGE ELDRIDGE
3 CLARKE ELDRIDGE BIRCH SMITH
4 BUTLER ALDRIDGE JOHNSON KING
5 ALLEN KING KING FLITNEY
6 EGLETON ADAMS WHEELER ALDRIDGE
7 ELDRIDGE WELLS GARNETT BIRCH
8 WADE HITCHCOCK LANE JOHNSON
9 HILL GINGER ALLEN ADAMS
10 TOMLINS TAYLOR FLEET WHEELER

 

Notes

Ellesborough is beautiful. The church of St Peter and St Paul, rising on its own hillock from the flat vale of Aylesbury, is set against a backcloth of hills. Beacon Hill and Coombe Hill rise above it. The focal point on the latter, the South African War Memorial, is visible for many miles.

It is a favourite place for locals and the view is breath-taking. From there, Chequers, the country home of Britain's Prime Ministers, can be glimpsed. It is in Ellesborough parish, and many Prime Ministers and visiting notables have attended the church services.

The friendly church ghost is said to be the Rev. Robert Wallis, rector of Ellesborough before the Civil War. He was seen on the path up to the church by the present rector not long ago.

The almhouses opposite the church are set in a colourful garden which is tended by the inhabitants. The building is known as 'Lady Dodd's Cottages'.
Down the steep hill is Ellesborough Manor, which has been a home for retired clergy, their wives and widows since 1950.
At St Peter's Cottage there is an aviary of beautiful white doves and down the first lane off the B4010 Mr Will Thomson breeds and delights in prize-winning pigeons. This lane leads to Springs, a fine house, 16th century with Edwardian additions. Immediately below a sheer drop in the lawn, four springs dramatically form the source of the stream called Bonnybrook.

A chain of ponds follow, the last of these being Ellesborough mill pond. The Mill was burnt down by a tramp in 1937.
Further down the Upper Icknield Way is Butlers Cross. This is the hub of the village. The much used Ellesborough village hall, the Russell Arms (the only public house) and the shop and post office are all here. The village hall, built in 1910 by public subscription, is a hive of activity.


Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission

Description

Description of Ellesborough from J. J. Sheahan, 1861.

Ellesborough parish is situated on the north side, and on a spur of Chiltern Hills. Its southern part rises into irregularly shaped hills, the northern portion is nearly level, and the soil accordingly varies. In the inferior grounds it is an argllaceous loam, interspersed with limestone; and in the higher lands, mostly chalk, gravel, and flints of various thickness. The area of the parish, including the hamlet of Dunmore, is 3,310 acres; population, 723; rateable value, £3,465.

The village is scattered and stands 2.5 miles W. by S. of Wendover, among the hills on the verge of the Vale of Aylesbury. At Butler's Cross, about a quarter of a mile from the church are a number of houses - the principle part of the village.

 

Education

Ellesborough Parish (Pop. 665)

One Sunday School, in which about 56 children of both sexes receive gratuitous instruction.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

 

1900 Bourne End Telephone Directory

old telephoneThere were 42 entries in the 1900 telephone directory for Bourne End. Although Bourne End was just a part of Wooburn Parish (the parish is now called "Wooburn and Bourne End") it did have its own Telephone Exchange.

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Notes on Fawley

Description

Description of Fawley from Sheahan, 1861.

This parish forms the extreme S.W. angle of Bucks, and is bounded on the E. by the Thames, and on the S. and W. by Oxfordshire. The boundary line between Bucks and Oxon passes through the lawn of Fawley Court. Area, 2,216 acres; population, 272. The village is much scattered; the Church stands 3 miles N. by W. from Henley-upon Thames, and 8 miles W. from Great Marlow.

Fawley Court is a handsome and spacious mansion, erected in 1684, from a design by Sir Christopher Wren. It occupies an elevated site overlooking the Thames, about a mile from Henley, and is surrounded by a park of 250 acres, well planted, and terminated by undulating hills, part clothed in beach.

Education

Fawley Parish (Pop. 254)

One Daily School (commenced 1833), in which about 30 children are instructed at the expense of their parents;

One Sunday School, wherein 50 receive gratuitous instruction.

ABSTRACT OF EDUCATION RETURNS, 1833.

 

 

Additional information