Ashendon

Introduction

Church: St Mary

Hundred: Ashendon

Poor Law District: Aylesbury

Size (acres): 2128

Easting & Northing: 470214

Grid Ref SP700140 Click to see map

Names

Names & Places

NameTypeNote
Ashendon PARISH St Mary
Assedone NAMES name for Ashendon in Domesday Book in 1086
Assedune NAMES name for Ashendon in Domesday Book in 1086
Asshyngdon NAMES name for Ashendon in 1546
Methodist NON-CONFORMIST First Mentioned: ?. Recorded 1851 Religious census
Hill PLACE within the parish
Pollicot PLACE within the parish
Watbridge PLACE within the parish

Population

Population

These population figures are based on the Census results. The boundaries are those used in the particular census which may vary over time..

Note  
1801 248
1811 319
1821 339
1831 368
1841 312
1851 290
1861 325
1871 274
1881 237
1891 199
1901 212
1911 227
1921 213
1931 200
1941 N/A
1951 167
1961 204
1971 191
1981 212
1991 236

There was no census in 1941.

Records

Records

Parish  Church  Register  Start
Date  
End
Date  
Online
Search  
E-Mail
Search  
Publication  
Ashendon   St Mary   Baptisms   1590   1906   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Ashendon   St Mary   Marriages   1590   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Ashendon   St Mary   Burials   1590   1901   Yes,
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Yes,
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Yes,
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Surnames

 

Surnames

These were extracted from our own records and presented as a guide.

PositionBefore 1700  18th Century  19th Century  Overall Surnames  
1 RICE EWERS EWERS EWERS
2 BAMPTON SMITH CHERRY CHERRY
3 TURNER ROSE EDWARDS SMITH
4 AMAN HUMPHREY MUNDAY EDWARDS
5 ROWLES NORRIS SMITH MUNDAY
6 JOHNSON BAMPTON FIGG FIGG
7 ADAMS HUMPHREYS WHEELER WHEELER
8 LEVERETT GREEN SAUNDERS SAUNDERS
9 HORTON EGLETON CHURCHILL TACK
10 EGGLETON BATES BETTS BAMPTON

 

Description

Ashendon, which includes the tiny hamlets of Upper and Lower Pollicott, is a small, friendly village which has changed relatively little in living memory. Built high on a ridge, it has magnificent views across the Vale of Aylesbury, particularly from the grounds of the 12th century church. The stone and brick cottages, some even thatched, convey the impression of an age old settlement, and indeed the 'place of ash trees on the hill' appears to have been of some importance in Saxon times.

Ashendon can boast of no 'big house' or well known personality, but it is a complete village, with its church, shop and public house, and the seven original farms still being worked, one of which has been farmed by the same family for at least 350 years. In the early part of the century a roadman was asked where a gentleman of the name of George lived; he replied, 'There b'aint no gentlemen in Ashendon, they be all farmers!' Agriculture remains the only industry in the village, and there are still several of the old village families left.

Although there is very little population movement, there is a good mix of old and new inhabitants, the newer ones always welcomed into the many and varied village activities. The traditional Ashendon Feast is alas now a distant memory of the past, recalled only by inhabitants in their late seventies and eighties. This was a great day to look forward to, always held on the first Tuesday in May, and folk used to say the weather would never warm up until after the Feast. The children were up bright and early, many going to the top of Lynch Hill to catch a first glimpse of the Fair people. A roundabout was soon erected in the Hanger, and swinging boats in the Square. Coconut shies ran parallel with the garden hedge of Cherry Cottage, and an old lady frying an inexhaustible supply of sausages was always part of the scene. Salt beef and ham were eaten in the evening at Ashendon Farm.

In 1962 a new village tradition began, originally to celebrate the belated hanging of a gate into the allotments. The gate had lain in the Hedge for several years, and at last two villagers fixed it in place. It was decided that a dinner should be arranged to mark the occasion, and each year since then the men of the village have met for the Ashendon Gatehangers dinner. Over the years the Gatehangers have helped the village in many ways, including gifts OAP's at Christmas, visits and gifts to people in hospital, and donations to help start the football club and to the Village Hall

Article written by members of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women's Institutes for the publication "The Buckinghamshire Village Book" (1987) and reproduced here with their permission


Notes

Ashenden is a parish in Ashenden hundred with a population in 1921 of 213 and is situated 9 miles to the west of Aylesbury.

In 1861 the population of Ashenden was 290.


Education

Ashendon (with Pollicot) Parish (Pop. 368)

The children of this parish attend a National School at Wootton, supported by the Duchess of Buckingham.

Abstract of Education Returns 1833

Memories

Until just before the First World War, Ashendon was a completely agricultural village. About that time, the first farmworker broke away from that way of life to work on the railway, and this caused a stir.

There were and still are seven farms in Ashendon with eight to ten men working on each. Farm workers were very proud of the farms they worked on and there was a friendly rivalry between them. It used to be customary for the men to meet in the evenings to compare the day's happenings and to boast of their achievements. They had great pride in their work.

Farmers brewed their own beer in large quantities as it was part of the men's wages. They had beer mid-morning, beer with their lunch and beer at tea-time. The more they had the better they worked. The mower had a pint at 4 am before starting work. Probably a hundred gallons of beer was drunk by each man a year. At haymaking they had a pint between each load and at night there was free access to the cellar. Despite this they were always fit and ready for work the next morning.

As in most villages, there was the annual Feast which was the great event of the year. It usually took the form of sports with a good feed afterwards and was always held on the first Tuesday in May. The farmworkers were given the day off as a paid holiday for this occasion. They usually took the next day off as well, to recover.

Molly Boughton, Ashendon

Extracted  from ‘A Pattern of Hundreds’(1975) with the kind permission of the Buckinghamshire Federation of Women’s Institutes 

Additional information